Advent in Narnia: The Lamppost 11/29/2019

“The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.” ~John 1:5

Day 2: Follow along in Chapter 1 in “The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe” and lesson 2 in “Advent in Narnia.”

The story tells us that Lucy discovers the lamppost and observes the curious scenery as she is walking through the wardrobe. How surprised would you be if while walking in the forest you came across a lamppost and it was illuminated. There is a history behind this seemingly odd lamppost, it had grew from an earthly lamppost. The White Witch in the story had previously used it as a weapon and was transformed into a lonely but shining light by Aslan. It served as a boundary between Narnia and “the wild woods of the west.” The lamppost was a living thing, no one ever lit it, no one ever blew it out, it has no fuel and the White Witch’s winter never snuffed it out. It indeed served as a boundary but also a promise from Aslan that broken things can be made new and alive. The lamppost is a beacon in the face of the dark, dreary and cold mystical spell that covered the land.

I love the imagery and imagination of C. S. Lewis and it’s agelessness across over the years since this story was originally written/published on October 16, 1950.

As we approach Advent, we too use candles and wreaths along with Christmas lights to illuminate the darkness. Advent is a season of celebration of the birth of Jesus, He is the light of the world. Just as the lamppost is alive and was there in the forest at the beginning, so was/is Jesus.

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” ~John 1:1.

Jesus was a light that was broken and made new in the Resurrection. Jesus is the Light that shines through darkness for everyone. The Light is Jesus serves as a beckon to the world and our curiosity draws us to seek Him.

John 8:12, “When Jesus spoke again to the people, he said, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.”

Things to ponder:

• Do you have any special lights around your home this season? *I keep a lamp turned on that sits on my fireplace mantel next to a manger set I leave out all year long. It brings me comfort seeing the baby representing Jesus, and Mary & Joseph, the animals the kings and an Angel.

• Quote by writer, Ann Lamont, “Lighthouses don’t go running all over an island looking for boats to save; they just stand there shining.” Does this resonate with Christ being the Light of the World? *I would agree with the writer and I’ve read her work and have enjoyed her unique perspective on the christian life. God loves us and is always with us, especially when we think we are not worthy, of course we are unworthy, Jesus died for us because He loves us and wanted to redeems us.

• Do you have a metaphor you would use to describe the light of Christ in your life this season? Is it glowing brightly, faintly, or way off in the distance? Perhaps you could write about it in a prayer or a poem or maybe a metaphor of the lamppost. *God is the supplier of my strength, not a materialistic protein powder kind of supplement way but through the power of the Holy Spirit and quiet meditation and study of His Word. In this season of Advent, I can see the lamppost in the distance and I’m committed to follow where it leads.

Original poem,

“It’s darkest before dawn, it’s been cloudy for days!”

~C.A.Robinson©️ 11/10/2015

~Peace~

References:

http://www.cslewis.org/resource/chronocsl/

https://biblehub.com/

4 thoughts on “Advent in Narnia: The Lamppost 11/29/2019

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